1. 1 year ago  /  1 note  / 

  2. Game of Redemption: Everyone Plays

    This film gave extraordinary insight on the lives of prisoners behind bars participating in a theater group.  The documentary really exposed true feelings of regret, and desire for forgiveness and redemption.  I don’t often get emotional when watching movies, but I really felt for the prisoners whose lives were captured, literally, and in the film.  It is strange that when you read a really great book, or watch a really great movie, the main character may be the biggest villain, or antagonist, but you still feel for them because of the perspective on the story.  This is something that happens when you watch this film.  Ordinarily, most people would not even consider the opinions, or the feelings of convicted criminals.  However, when you watch this movie, you really feel the pain of regret that they carry.  It is especially heavy at the end of the film, to find out that Sammie was denied parole.

    This film has many obvious parallels to The Tempest.  While Prospero was given the chance to forgive those that treated him badly, one may say that a parole board is given the chance, or handed the decision, of whether a criminal should be forgiven for the wrongs they have done to others, and permitted to move on, or stay contained at Luther Luckett.  It is very situational in the real-life, present-day scenario.  Certain crimes are worse than others, and certain people react differently to imprisonment than others.  One would like to think that forgiveness is always the obvious better choice, but it also seems to be obvious that certain crimes and certain criminals deserve to be punished for their actions, and many need to be imprisoned for the safety of others.  So, it is impossible to say that either way is right, or that either way works every time.  If someone was always forgiving, they would become a “pushover.”  If someone never forgives, they could lose loved ones over little things.  This sometimes happens in everyday life, when someone holds a grudge over something small.  Each person must sometimes judge whether their loved ones’ actions should be forgiven.  The concepts discussed in the film, and in the Shakespearean drama both leave me thinking…who are we to decide what actions are or are not worthy of forgiveness?

    1 year ago  /  1 note  / 

  3. Education Opens The Door…

    Education was a very big, less conspicuous underlying theme in Shakespeare Behind Bars.  When the “cast members” were being interviewed, many of them expressed desire to further their educations.  Before they were imprisoned, most of them either never had the opportunity to complete their education, or were distracted, obviously by crime.  It is ironic that for most of them, going to prison meant furthering their educations.  Hal developed a love for Shakespeare, and for poetry while he was at Luther Luckett.  He continued with the SBB program and was awarded a 3rd place Pen Award in poetry.  Hal was also invited to participate in the Anne Frank Center USA Prison Diary Project.  The goal of this project is to educate people inside and outside of prisons.  Redemption and forgiveness were the conspicuous themes of this film, but it seems that Hal achieved those things through education.  He educated himself in prison, and went on to help many others become more educated.  As mentioned at the end of the film, Big G graduated college!  He also went on to train dogs from the county pound to prepare them for adoption.  So far, every dog that Big G has trained has been adopted.  Although they are not humans, these dogs are also prisoners in a way, and Big G definitely gave them possibility for lives they would not have had otherwise.  Greg not only went on to get married, and become a civil engineer, but he also now publishes poetry online!  As Leonard said during the movie, the prisoners want to achieve forgiveness and not be remembered for the terrible things that they had done long ago.  The prisoners did this through learning about the outside world, and trying to leave a good mark on it.  Many of them did this successfully, and redeemed themselves for their crimes by leaving a positive aspect on the world.  Is it possible that going to prison gave these men opportunity that they would not have had if they had not been arrested?

    1 year ago  /  1 note  /   /  Source: http

  4. slightly funnier visually than in imagination…

    slightly funnier visually than in imagination…

    1 year ago  /  0 notes  / 

  5. I had read “The Second Shepherd’s Play,” and written a rumination about it before we skipped the reading.  If anyone else read it also and would like to discuss, here is my “rumination” about the play.

    Everybody loves Raymond, right? A good sitcom is always funny, and what’s funnier than marriage? The ups and downs of married people are a great topic for general comedy. It is obvious from reading “The Second Shepherd’s Play,” that the people of England at this time period would agree.

    It is very interesting when the second shepherd enters the stage and complains about his marriage.  It is very similar to the way that comedians and everyday people today mock relationships. Although he is comparing the cock and the hen to a human couple, I do not think that the choice of words that were used is a coincidence. The shepherd explains that when the hen, or wife, is upset, “woe be to our cock, for he is in shackles.” It goes without saying that there is a pun involved here. In addition, the wording used to describe that the married man is “in shackles,” is not unlike the current phrase commonly used, “the old ball and chain.”

    Another similar part pops up later on in the play, while Mak complains about the situation with his wife. He says, “and each year they’ll a day be, she brings forth a baby, and some years two.”  It is obviously absurd that Mak is blaming his wife for having children. Obviously he had some part in her getting pregnant. This comment reminded me of the way an angry father might say to his wife, “Look what your son did!” Even though the child is both of theirs, the father wants to push blame on the wife when he is unhappy with their son. This is a scene often depicted in modern television shows.

    It is interesting that husband and wife relationships are seen in sitcoms today, and in comedic plays of the past. It is amazing that people of two different eras can find the same simple topic humorous. 

    1 year ago  /  0 notes  / 

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  8. 1 year ago  /  4 notes  / 

  9. I was interested in the reasoning behind a Scottish king becoming an English king, so I googled it.  I found this family tree & short description on wiki & it’s pretty interesting…

Painted genealogy showing James I’s Tudor ancestry. Mary Stuart Queen of Scots, James’ mother, is shown in the center of the second row, holding hands to signify marriage first with Francois II and secondly with Lord Darnley, father of James. Beneath Mary to her right are her parents, James V of Scotland and Mary of Guise. Beneath Darnley are his parents Lady Margaret Douglas and Matthew Stewart, Earl of Lennox. Mary and Darnley share a grandmother, Margaret Tudor in the center of the fourth row, Henry VII’s eldest daughter. She first married James IV of Scotland (to her left) and became mother of James V and then married Archibald Douglas, Earl of Angus. On the bottom row are the founders of the Tudor dynasty, Henry VII of Lancaster and Elizabeth of York.

    I was interested in the reasoning behind a Scottish king becoming an English king, so I googled it.  I found this family tree & short description on wiki & it’s pretty interesting…

    Painted genealogy showing James I’s Tudor ancestry. Mary Stuart Queen of Scots, James’ mother, is shown in the center of the second row, holding hands to signify marriage first with Francois II and secondly with Lord Darnley, father of James. Beneath Mary to her right are her parents, James V of Scotland and Mary of Guise. Beneath Darnley are his parents Lady Margaret Douglas and Matthew Stewart, Earl of Lennox. Mary and Darnley share a grandmother, Margaret Tudor in the center of the fourth row, Henry VII’s eldest daughter. She first married James IV of Scotland (to her left) and became mother of James V and then married Archibald Douglas, Earl of Angus. On the bottom row are the founders of the Tudor dynasty, Henry VII of Lancaster and Elizabeth of York.

    2 years ago  /  0 notes  / 

  10. 2 years ago  /  0 notes  /